The Commitments Barrytown Dublin has something to sing about The Commitments are spreading the gospel of the soul Ably managed by Jimmy Rabbitte brilliantly coached by Joey The Lips Fagan their twin assault on Mo

  • Title: The Commitments
  • Author: Roddy Doyle
  • ISBN: 9780749391683
  • Page: 402
  • Format: Paperback
  • Barrytown, Dublin, has something to sing about The Commitments are spreading the gospel of the soul Ably managed by Jimmy Rabbitte, brilliantly coached by Joey The Lips Fagan, their twin assault on Motown and Barrytown takes them by leaps and bounds from the parish hall to the steps of the studio door But can The Commitments live up to their name

    • The Commitments by Roddy Doyle
      402 Roddy Doyle
    • thumbnail Title: The Commitments by Roddy Doyle
      Posted by:Roddy Doyle
      Published :2019-02-20T05:20:52+00:00

    About "Roddy Doyle"

    1. Roddy Doyle

      Roddy Doyle Irish Ruaidhr D ill is an Irish novelist, dramatist and screenwriter Several of his books have been made into successful films, beginning with The Commitments in 1991 He won the Booker Prize in 1993.Doyle grew up in Kilbarrack, Dublin He graduated with a Bachelor of Arts from University College, Dublin He spent several years as an English and geography teacher before becoming a full time writer in 1993.

    930 thoughts on “The Commitments”

    1. Have you got Soul? If yes, The World's Hardest Working Band is looking for you. Contact J. Rabbitte, 118, Chestnut Ave Dublin 21. Rednecks and southsiders need not apply. I don't think I ever recommended before seeing a movie before reading the book it was based on, but in the case of Roddy Doyle's debut novel I believe this order will enhance the experience. You see, this is a musical novel, and it's done in a combination of dialogue and song lyrics, with minimal stage directions, no descriptiv [...]


    2. A short, sweet tale of the birth and short life of an Irish soul band, full of humor and exhilaration. It feels like that sense of delicious surprise at being able to skate on thin ice. Young Jimmy Rabbitte, unemployed resident of a fictional working class neighborhood of Dublin, Barrytown, gets the brilliant idea that Ireland needs sex machine music like James Brown’s. We get the pleasure of his imagination at work as he puts together his band one by one and works up a repertoire of songs. Th [...]


    3. I was going to attempt to write this review in the working class Dublin slang that Roddy Doyle’s colourful characters use, but, ya know, Jaysis, I’d come o’ looking like a fuckin’ eejit.I’m one of the few people on the planet who’s never seen the Alan Parker movie, and when I was in London last fall, I noticed there was even a long-running stage version of it. But I guess through cultural osmosis I knew what the book was about: the making (and abrupt unmaking) of a north Dublin soul [...]


    4. Back in the day (I always wanted to use that in one of my reviews) my buddies and I from the old neighborhood had a dream. Besides wanting to be starting shortstops for our favorite baseball teams (Red Sox for me) we wanted to reach fame and fortune through music. There was only one hitch: none of us could sing, and none of us could play an instrument. Nevertheless, we moved forward with our dream and started penning lyrics to songs with no music…our muses were more than confused. For the most [...]


    5. I read Doyle's The Woman Who Walked Into Doors a few weeks ago and found it both a harrowing account of one woman's life, as well as a subversive insight to suburban Irish culture. I was expecting more of the same with his other writing and was, sadly, a little disappointed. The novel follows the formation of teenage band, The Commitments: through the choosing of band members, the finessing of performance, the highs from the shared passion for music, and the lows after the inevitable in-band cla [...]


    6. I went into this book knowing nothing about it, not having seen the movie, certainly not having seen the musical and not being familiar with the Irish institution that is Roddy Doyle.Initially I thought there was a mistake and I somehow obtained the screenplay for the film rather than the novel. Doyle shows a true bravado in his disregard for what we assume to constitute a novel. His narrative is composed almost entirely of dialogues and some diminished descriptions which are no more than stage [...]


    7. In the grim north side of Dublin Jimmy decides to put together a band to play soul music from the 60s. His mates think he's mental. They say, But that kind of stuff is sung by black people. Ain't it? And we're just scummy white kids, ain't we? But Jimmy has a reply to that :Do you not get it, lads? The Irish are the blacks of Europe. And Dubliners are the blacks of Ireland. And the Northside Dubliners are the blacks of Dublin. So say it once, say it loud: I'm black and I'm proud. Dean, Jimmy's m [...]



    8. This bracing, funny, honest, and charming first novel tracks the brief existence of The Commitments, a working-class Dublin band bent on bringing soul to the people. Fortunately for Outspan and Derek, who've decided to form And, And!, And, a syntho-pop cover band (as soon as they get the money to buy instruments, anyway), Jimmy Rabbite consents to be their manager. Jimmy's the sharpest industry observer in northern Dublin ("Jimmy had Relax before anyone had heard of Frankie Goes to Hollywood and [...]


    9. Onpas ensiluokkaisesti toteutettu äänikirja!Lukijalla on oikeanlainen aksentti ja hän jopa laulaa!Voisin kuunnella saman tien uudestaan.


    10. First of all, I've not yet seen the movie that was made from this book, but now I want to. If the movie is at all true to the book, I know I'm going to love it.Set in working-class North Dublin, the novel begins with teens Outspan, Derek and Ray, who have formed a new band called And And And. Only in existence for three days, Outspan and Derek decide they need help with the band's direction and go to music-manager guru Jimmy Rabbitte, who"ate melody Maker and the NME every week and Hot Press eve [...]


    11. A classic. Now the Doyle is writing about middle-aged Jimmy Rabbitte in The Guts, it is essential to go back and remind ourselves of the young Jimmy. In the late 80's, Dubliners were still underemployed, and things were cheaper. They had to be. No one had any money! I have always loved this story of a Dublin soul band. I'd forgotten how short-lived this group was. But while they were together, they had a terrific time. Ireland and Dublin have changed dramatically in 25 years. Ireland boomed and [...]


    12. I'm not sure why it's taken me this long to read 'The Commitments' (I haven't seen the film either), but I purchased the book and decided to read it having heard many good reports about its recently released sequel, 'The Guts'. Such a short book, but what a treat!I'm sure the narrative is pretty familiar to most-it was to me, just through clips I'd seen of the movie / things I'd read over the years about the book-but I have to say that, in the short time it took me to read the book, I was freque [...]


    13. Of dreams and dreamers. Light-hearted, funny, charming. I'd even give it 4.5 compared to the other books I'm reading/have recently read. Read in 5h.


    14. A quick little read; heavy on dialogue. Irish dialogue. Very thick and very fast. I loved the movie and wanted to read the book before I watched it again. I really liked the antics of Jimmy and the gang as they progressed from a group of wannabe musicians to small time fame in central Dublin. There's a great group dynamic going on behind the story; everyone's in love with the backup singers, everyone hates the lead singer, Joey The Lips Fagan keeps everyone on an even keel, and Jimmy tries to ke [...]


    15. The Commitments is a small band formed in Dublin by a group of young and unemployed folks. Their one goal in life is to bring SOUL to Dublin. The biggest problem is the leading members really don't know that much about music history, so they hire a friend to manage them and help create the image they have for themselves.There isn't a lot of story here. Quite simply it is about music, but deeper than that is the will to be more, to bring more to the table. Quick read, which was nice in that it wa [...]


    16. The cockney accent dialogue of working class Dublin is humorous once you figure it out. Do yourself a favor and view the 1991 classic film, The Commitments. Then download the CD from iTunes and sit back and enjoy the people’s sound.



    17. This is a gem. A book that is dialogue driven with the a few songs thrown in. Jimmy wants to start a Soul Band in Barrytown but having no talent doesn't put him or the other band members off. Their just do it attitude comes across and no obstacle gets in the way. Off course they have their disagreements and all of the boys fancy Natalie. A non too serious look at Irish life which I enjoyed more than the film


    18. A lighthearted book about some Dublin guys and gals who form a band, The Commitments, that wants to bring Soul to Ireland. They rehearse, break up, rehearse some more, go on stage, are close to signing a record deal, and break up again, before regrouping as The Brassers. The book can easily be read in a few hours, and I'd recommend to listen to the songs they're playing as you're reading along.




    19. Its been about 25 years since I read this last and its still as enjoyable now as it was then. A quick light read and so funny.


    20. The Commitments by Roddy Doyle is about a young irish man from Dublin forming a band and trying to bring a unique sound and soul to Dublin that the region has lacked.This is a really fun read! The characters and dialogue are full of life and charming. The dynamic of the band and the conflict/tensions between the band members is brought to life in an endearing way. Awful bastards like Deco, reserved charming artists like Dean, tantalizing beauties like Imelda, and wise and experienced soul-filled [...]



    21. An expanded version of this appears on The Irresponsible Reader.-----Will yeh please put your workin' class hands together for your heroes. The Saviours o' Soul, The Hardest Workin' Band in the World, —Yes, Yes, Yes, Yes —The Commitments.This is a tough one for me to talk about -- long time fan, read it a dozen or so times, it's all I can do to not turn total fan-boy and just gush. eh, I might not try too hard.It's the late 80's and three young Dubliners (from the poorest part of Dublin) have [...]


    22. The Commitments (1987) is Irish author Roddy Doyle's first published work. Set in late 1980s Dublin, it tells the story of Jimmy Rabbitte and the rag-tag group of friends and musicians he recruits to form a band dedicated to bringing soul music to the city. The novella is as funny as the premise suggests. We begin when two teenage musicians, Outspan and Derek - unhappy with their current band's leadership - approach Jimmy - a hard-core music fan who always knows what's cool and what's not - for [...]


    23. What a fresh change to the books I've been reading lately. The Commitments is a story told almost only through dialogue in Dublin slang, kind of like a play, but at the same time more like a novel. It tells the funny, straightforward, and honest story of a short-lived Dublin band consisting of teenagers with bigger-than-life egos whose bravadoes don't fool anyone - except maybe the other teenagers. The band is nannied by a balding middle-aged man who, according to himself, has performed with Jam [...]


    24. I remember a friend of mine, who I thought at the time wouldn't be inclined to contribute his opinion on certain matters, put forward a priceless piece of advice. His favorite book was determined by how many times it had made him laugh out loud. I took that to heart when reading this book, and all of Roddy Doyle's books. As much as I can recall, the Commitments had me laughing out loud more than any novel I've read before or since. A critical aspect of a lot of art, music has the potential to es [...]


    25. I had this book begun and done before I even had a chance to mark it as "currently reading." It took me about 3 days, which is about 3 hours in normal non-baby-raising reading time. The majority of the book is dialogue, song lyrics, and rhythm licks (DUHH DUHH DUUUUHHH), so it moves pretty dang fast. Anyway, the content since The Commitments is one of my favorite movies of all time, I expected to enjoy the book a lot, and I did, but I have to say, I think it may fall under that very rare catego [...]


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